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  1. #21
    Member URETROID's Avatar
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    Nice Work / tut .THX!

  2. #22
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    This is a boardless 555 timer mod for a box 360 controller, I am used in my suped up controller. You can do the same with ur mod make things alittle smaller maybe. Your using a different capacitor and ur replacing another capacitor with a resistor. After I make the board if I think it looks to big I'll probably make it without the board. The out come should look some what the same way though. Thanx for the info I've been wanting to change the fan speed. Like u said sadly the hackers haven't made a way to do it yet. I've been waiting for that and a few other things.

    My controller for those that would like to see.

  3. #23
    Senior Member KillerBug's Avatar
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    LoL...as long as it works; the electricity does not know the difference.

    BTW...if anyone is interested, I also have a design of this in a "Plug-n-Play" format. It requires more parts and more soldering, and it is larger (5x9 holes) but you don't need to do any cutting on the stock fan wires, and it is a nice quick install (could be useful if you are doing a friend's system or something). I made one up today and it took about 2 hours to complete...but it works great. If I get a enough requests, I'll go see my friend with the 3D cad software again and make up another guide.

  4. #24
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    nice controller its a little big tho and not to many people can realy wire it well for the people just trying to do thiss

    also i did one a few years back only used 3 resisters and 1 micro pot and it is inclosed in side the sysem and dosent stick out i got a vid of the first mod i did of just runing the fan with out ps3 on youtube i found if u take the brown and gray wire and put resistence between them the fan speed will drop its the fan speed sence trick :P works and dosent run hot only costs 3$ lol and 1 min to build up just wondering u ever thing of smt components to mod the fan speed or not that the ps3 is hacked whast about software hack

  5. #25
    Senior Member KillerBug's Avatar
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    I wouldn't know where to start for a software hack...other than forwarding the idea to a few of the big names (that did nothing). Plus, there is still the issue that less than 10% of all PS3s are running CFW...so that approach would leave over 90% of the community out in the cold.

    I don't have the equipment to do SMD, and if you think that not many people can do this as a through-hole, then almost no one can do it as SMD.

    This device can lower fan speeds, but it is mainly for raising fan speeds, or for controlling fan speeds on systems that no longer control the fan correctly.

    You don't actually have to mount the POT if you don't want to; it just makes adjustment a lot easier.

  6. #26
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    what would you use this for

  7. #27
    Senior Member KillerBug's Avatar
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    I have finally received my long delayed PNP PCBs. I just made up 8 fan controllers and tested them; they all worked perfectly. I have 42 more PCBs to make when I get around to it.

    The new design is meant to be hassle-free. There is no soldering, no cutting, no drilling, no gluing, no taping. You still have to open the system. The installation consists of unplugging the fan from the mainboard, plugging it into the fan controller, and then plugging the fan controller into the mainboard. In the case of 40GB and later fat consoles, this can be done simply by removing the top cover. Slims need the top cover and the power supply removed, but the power supply is easily removed without removing any other components. Fat systems before the 40GB model are a bit trickier as the fan port is located on the underside of the mainboard, but it is still not very hard to get at.

    Speed is set by a trimmer screw (the small circle on the top of the blue thing). It is designed to have the fan speed set before you reinstall the cover.

    In addition to the easy install, this design allows for easy removal if you ever need to send the system in for repair or if we see CFWs with fan control at some point.

    I am selling these for $20+shipping. Inside the USA, I use priority mail and it costs $5.20. International air mail varies by country, but is generally around $5.



    BILAL97 - It controls fan speed; mostly for preventing YLODs and for keeping them from coming back after repairs.

  8. #28
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    The last fan wire (gray) will be cut-off near the mainboard. The end going to the mainboard will be taped up with electrical tape, and the end going to the fan will connect to the orange wire from the controller. If you can, I recommend connecting the controller to a 12V AC adapter
    Connecting the controller to a 12V AC adapter where at? Solder it to the same orange wire?

    Edit: 1
    There are thee wires towards the top, a black and two reds. These wires go to the POT. The black goes to the center lead, the red wires go to the other two leads. The red wire that is above pin 5 of the TLC555 should go to the "High Side" of the pot...the pin that you turn the knob towards when you want the fan to go faster (knob can be made to work in either direction).

    There are three more wires towards the bottom (red, black, and orange). Red is spliced into the brown wire going to the fan. Black is spliced into the black wire going to the fan. Both of these wires still go to the mainboard and the fan, but now also to the controller. The last fan wire (gray) will be cut-off near the mainboard. The end going to the mainboard will be taped up with electrical tape, and the end going to the fan will connect to the orange wire from the controller. If you can, I recommend connecting the controller to a 12V AC adapter and a multimeter before soldering it into the system. Fat units should output about 0.45V at "low speed" and about 4.55V at "high speed" these numbers can vary as much as .5V depending on the specific components used. Slim units should vary from about 0.3V to 3.0V .
    Somethings not working here. Orange wire to gray. Bottom red wire to brown wire. Bottom Black wire to black wire.....

    I turn on the ps3 and the fan starts and stops...
    Last edited by Magnus Hydra; 02-21-2011 at 01:19 AM.

  9. #29
    Senior Member KillerBug's Avatar
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    If you can, I recommend connecting the controller to a 12V AC adapter and a multimeter before soldering it into the system.
    I just meant this for testing; if you make a mistake in the design, then the output can be 12V; so I recommend testing the thing outside of the PS3 before installation. The hot lead of the 12V AC adapter connects to the bottom red wire, and the negative lead connects to the bottom black wire.

    You have the wiring correct; I would recommend checking the output on the orange wire to see if the outputs are correct. If you forgot to solder the ground on the voltage regulator, the output will be 12V (too high).

  10. #30
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    Nice guide, I like sending PM for the boards tho

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